Covid-19 Pandemic Increased Aggression Among Couples? This Is What Study Says

The study finds that the pandemic resulted in a six-to-eightfold increase in rates of intimate partner aggression.


Physical aggression increased from two acts per year to 15 acts per year.


Psychological aggression increased from 16 acts per year to 96 acts per year.


In a recent experimental study, Georgia State University researchers found that the lockdown restrictions led by the Covid-19 pandemic have resulted in increased rates of physical and psychological aggression among couples.


The findings of the study were published in the journal ‘Psychology of Violence’.


The study found that the pandemic resulted in a six-to-eightfold increase in rates of intimate partner aggression across the US.


Physical aggression increased from two acts per year before the pandemic to 15 acts per year once shelter-in-place restrictions began.


Psychological aggression increased from 16 acts per year to 96 acts per year.


The findings indicated that stress related to the pandemic was strongly associated with the perpetration of intimate partner aggression, even among individuals considered at low risk.


“If you think about it, that [increase] represents an enormous shift in people’s day-to-day lives,” said the study’s lead author Dominic Parrott, professor of psychology and director of the Centre for Research on Interpersonal Violence.(Courtesy: https://www.hindustantimes.com/)


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